Corner House is shaped by many inspirations. The strands of history, science, memory, art, passion and gastronomy come together to create a luminous experience in a singular setting.

The Botanist

Eldred John Henry Corner, a British botanist specializing in mycology (the study of fungi), was Assistant Director of the Botanic Gardens from 1929 to 1945. Corner developed the use of ‘botanical monkeys’ to collect botanical specimens from tall forest trees, and propounded the controversial ‘Durian Theory’ which posits the durian as one of the most primitive of fruiting trees.

Corner helped establish the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve in the 1930s and popularized local flora through public lessons and the writing of books such as Wayside Trees of Malaya, published in 1940. In 2013, his son John K Corner wrote a book about his life, My Father in His Suitcase: In Search of E J H Corner the Relentless Botanist.

The Botanist

Eldred John Henry Corner, a British botanist specializing in mycology (the study of fungi), was Assistant Director of the Botanic Gardens from 1929 to 1945. Corner developed the use of ‘botanical monkeys’ to collect botanical specimens from tall forest trees, and propounded the controversial ‘Durian Theory’ which posits the durian as one of the most primitive of fruiting trees.

Corner helped establish the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve in the 1930s and popularized local flora through public lessons and the writing of books such as Wayside Trees of Malaya, published in 1940. In 2013, his son John K Corner wrote a book about his life, My Father in His Suitcase: In Search of E J H Corner the Relentless Botanist.

The House

Corner House was home to a fascinating man who made critical contributions to Singapore’s history.

Not only was E J H Corner responsible for the ‘greening’ of Singapore by means of the nature reserves, the Botanic Gardens and roadside trees, he also helped safeguard the scientific and cultural possessions of Singapore during the Japanese Occupation, particularly the collections of the National Museum and the National Library.

Named after him, the CORNER HOUSE, in which E J H Corner lived, was built in 1910 and is a fine example of the Black and White bungalows built to house officials and administrators during the Colonial era. In 2008, it became a protected conservation building. Today, it remains steeped in Corner’s presence.

The House

Corner House was home to a fascinating man who made critical contributions to Singapore’s history.

Not only was E J H Corner responsible for the ‘greening’ of Singapore by means of the nature reserves, the Botanic Gardens and roadside trees, he also helped safeguard the scientific and cultural possessions of Singapore during the Japanese Occupation, particularly the collections of the National Museum and the National Library.

Named after him, the CORNER HOUSE, in which E J H Corner lived, was built in 1910 and is a fine example of the Black and White bungalows built to house officials and administrators during the Colonial era. In 2008, it became a protected conservation building. Today, it remains steeped in Corner’s presence.

The Garden

Throughout its 150-year history, the Singapore Botanic Gardens has been a center for the study of tropical plants from South East Asia, and the locus of important innovation in commercial horticulture, especially in orchid hybridization.

Today it holds many distinctions. Among them is a five-hectare garden containing the world’s most extensive and comprehensive exposition of orchid culture, one of Asia’s largest collections of rare palms, the first Cool House in the tropics to recreate the climatic conditions of equatorial montane forests, an irreplaceable library and herbarium collection, and a six-hectare tract of primeval forest in the heart of one of the world’s busiest port cities.

It is also a botanical Noah’s Ark, where plant species otherwise facing the threat of extinction are preserved and studied. The Gardens was successfully inscribed as Singapore’s first UNESCO World Heritage site in 2015.

The Garden

Throughout its 150-year history, the Singapore Botanic Gardens has been a center for the study of tropical plants from South East Asia, and the locus of important innovation in commercial horticulture, especially in orchid hybridization.

Today it holds many distinctions. Among them is a five-hectare garden containing the world’s most extensive and comprehensive exposition of orchid culture, one of Asia’s largest collections of rare palms, the first Cool House in the tropics to recreate the climatic conditions of equatorial montane forests, an irreplaceable library and herbarium collection, and a six-hectare tract of primeval forest in the heart of one of the world’s busiest port cities.

It is also a botanical Noah’s Ark, where plant species otherwise facing the threat of extinction are preserved and studied. The Gardens was successfully inscribed as Singapore’s first UNESCO World Heritage site in 2015.

The Botany

Botany is celebrated at CORNER HOUSE in visual motifs such as the logo, graphics, tableware and pictures on the wall, with incorporation of ‘botanical’ monkeys.

Gastro-Botanica is the name and guiding philosophy of the cuisine, and the object to mark the birth of the restaurant and honour its identity is the orchid Dendrobium HCH Corner House.

Botany is also present in the restaurant’s culinary devotion to nature, ecology and sustainability; and in the history of the bungalow and its surrounds, the Botanic Gardens. Last but not least, botany and horticulture would be a recurrent theme of events and activities staged at Corner House.

The Botany

Botany is celebrated at CORNER HOUSE in visual motifs such as the logo, graphics, tableware and pictures on the wall, with incorporation of ‘botanical’ monkeys.

Gastro-Botanica is the name and guiding philosophy of the cuisine, and the object to mark the birth of the restaurant and honour its identity is the orchid Dendrobium HCH Corner House.

Botany is also present in the restaurant’s culinary devotion to nature, ecology and sustainability; and in the history of the bungalow and its surrounds, the Botanic Gardens. Last but not least, botany and horticulture would be a recurrent theme of events and activities staged at Corner House.